Jenkins Collaboratory: Teaching

A list of current and recent course offerings

ISIS 650S. Critical Studies in New Media (Spring 2015) addresses key issues in the philosophy of new media. Central themes include the materiality of media; media configurations and their co-evolution with human being; computational media and recent discussions of posthumanism; the merger of nano-bio-info-technology and the ubiquity of code; media convergence and the political uses of new media. Examines new media technologies from a transdisciplinary perspective. Builds upon existing expertise in film, literature, and media studies to analyze what is "new" about new media and how they compare with, transform, and remediate earlier media practices. Proposes the development of a critical analytical framework for approaching new media and relating them to other areas of academic discourse. Promotes a hands-on active engagement with the technologies as a means for analysis and critique of new media innovations in contemporary academic research. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 670. BodyWorks (Spring 2015). Before World War II, the typical American physician had a modest toolbox consisting of a thermometer, stethoscope, and sphygmomanometer, occasional access to x-ray machines and electrocardiographs, and a very limited cabinet of pharmaceuticals. Beginning in the late 1950s, but accelerating at an ever-faster pace at the turn of the millennium, technology has dramatically transformed the landscape of modern medicine. BodyWorks examines the influence of new medical technologies (organ transplantation, endoscopic surgery, genetic engineering, computer-aided tomography, medical imaging, nanotechnology and nanosurgery, molecular and DNA computing, neural implant interfaces) on the American imagination from WWII to the current decade. The aim of the course is to examine the thesis that these dramatic new ways of imaging, controlling, restoring, remaking, possibly even choosing bodies have participated in a complete reshaping of the notion of the body in the cultural imaginary and a transformation of our experience of actual human bodies. The history of recent and contemporary medical technology will serve as our material context to explore this thesis about body-work using theories of postmodernism to address the questions: Are there postmodern bodies? If so, how have they been constructed? Among the themes we will explore is Donna Haraway's notion of the postmodern cyborg body and Katherine Hayles' conception of the posthuman. The class will be conducted as a hybrid graduate/undergraduate colloquium framed by student presentations related to the course readings. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

MFAEDA 703. Experimental and Documentary Arts: Telling Realism (Spring 2014) examines the conditions of possibility of politically and socially engaged documentary as a medium of truth. We will consider the historical and conceptual arch of the documentary arts across time, with special attention to the shifts in practice, audience, and approach that have expanded, revised, reshaped, and deepened documentary art. Documentarians occupy positions as artist practitioners and authoritative observers; in recent years, however, documentarians have questioned their privileged role and challenged it in the practice of their work. In this course we explore questions about objectivity, subjectivity, insider/outsider dynamics, politics, social values, power relations, self-representation, the reliability of memory and autobiography in the making and dissemination of documentary work. A central focus of our inquiry is on the role of technological media, particularly photography, film, and sound recording and the enabling or potentially disruptive effects of digital technologies and new social media on truth telling. (Instructors: Herron, Lenoir, Rankin)

ISIS 650S. Critical Studies in New Media (Spring 2013) addresses key issues in the philosophy of new media. Central themes include the materiality of media; media configurations and their co-evolution with human being; computational media and recent discussions of posthumanism; the merger of nano-bio-info-technology and the ubiquity of code; media convergence and the political uses of new media. Examines new media technologies from a transdisciplinary perspective. Builds upon existing expertise in film, literature, and media studies to analyze what is "new" about new media and how they compare with, transform, and remediate earlier media practices. Proposes the development of a critical analytical framework for approaching new media and relating them to other areas of academic discourse. Promotes a hands-on active engagement with the technologies as a means for analysis and critique of new media innovations in contemporary academic research. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 510S. How They Got Game (Fall 2012). History and cultural impact of interactive simulations and video games. Evolution of computer and video game design from its beginnings to the present: storytelling, strategy, simulation, sports, 3D first-person games. Cultural, business, and technical perspectives. Insights into design, production, marketing, and socio-cultural impacts of interactive entertainment and communication. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

MFAEDA 302. Genealogies of the Experimental (Fall 2012). The course explores the construction of selected avant-garde, underground, alternative, counter culture and experimental practices in the theoretical context of artist manifestos and writings, as well as in the related secondary and tertiary literature from the humanities and social sciences to sciences, with special attention to critical literature in art history and cultural and visual studies. Students will examine such artistic production in the context of modernist and poststructuralist theories and methodologies from formalism to postmodernism, postcolonial theory, and current twenty-first century approaches. Students will articulate a personal and/or group relationship to the current potentials of the "experimental" through multiple practice-based assignments. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 210S. How They Got Game (Fall 2011). History and cultural impact of interactive simulations and video games. Evolution of computer and video game design from its beginnings to the present: storytelling, strategy, simulation, sports, 3D first-person games. Cultural, business, and technical perspectives. Insights into design, production, marketing, and socio-cultural impacts of interactive entertainment and communication. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

MFAEDA 302. Genealogies of the Experimental (Fall 2011). The course explores the construction of selected avant-garde, underground, alternative, counter culture and experimental practices in the theoretical context of artist manifestos and writings, as well as in the related secondary and tertiary literature from the humanities and social sciences to sciences, with special attention to critical literature in art history and cultural and visual studies. Students will examine such artistic production in the context of modernist and poststructuralist theories and methodologies from formalism to postmodernism, postcolonial theory, and current twenty-first century approaches. Students will articulate a personal and/or group relationship to the current potentials of the "experimental" through multiple practice-based assignments. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 250S. Critical Studies in New Media (Spring 2011) addresses key issues in the philosophy of new media. Central themes include the materiality of media; media configurations and their co-evolution with human being; computational media and recent discussions of posthumanism; the merger of nano-bio-info-technology and the ubiquity of code; media convergence and the political uses of new media. Examines new media technologies from a transdisciplinary perspective. Builds upon existing expertise in film, literature, and media studies to analyze what is "new" about new media and how they compare with, transform, and remediate earlier media practices. Proposes the development of a critical analytical framework for approaching new media and relating them to other areas of academic discourse. Promotes a hands-on active engagement with the technologies as a means for analysis and critique of new media innovations in contemporary academic research. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 263S. Post-Digital Architectures—Living Machines (Fall 2010) explores the impact of advanced technology on conceptions of architectural design, new urban environments, and the cultural imaginary of the body since the mid-1990s. Beginning with theories of postmodernism in architecture we address the impact of virtuality (immersive digital environments, mixed, and augmented reality) on recent architectural theory and practice in the rise of digital architecture. Exploration of time-based new media, game environments, and virtual worlds technologies in the rise of digital architecture from the late 1990s-2000s is set in dialog with theoretical readings from Deleuze and Guattari, Liz Grosz, Brian Massumi, Neil Denari, Peter Eisenman, Rem Koolhaas, Greg Lynn, John Rajchman, Gordon Pask, Gilbert Simondon, and others. Our trajectory takes us next to an exploration of programs for post-digital architecture that draw upon emerging fields of synthetic biology, and artificial life including the integration of nanotechnologies, biomimetic technologies, smart materials, and protocells into the design of self-organizing bottom-up designs for living architecture and reflexive environments. Our discussion of post-digital architecture engages the work of Simondon, Spillers, Armstrong, and others. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 250S. Critical Studies in New Media (Fall 2009) addresses key issues in the philosophy of new media. Central themes include the materiality of media; media configurations and the co-evolution of human being; computational media and recent discussions of posthumanism; the merger of nano-bio-info-technology and the ubiquity of code; media convergence and the political uses of new media. Examines new media technologies from a transdisciplinary perspective. Builds upon existing expertise in film, literature, and media studies to analyze what is "new" about new media and how they compare with, transform, and remediate earlier media practices. Proposes the development of a critical analytical framework for approaching new media and relating them to other areas of academic discourse. Promotes a hands-on, active engagement with the technologies as a means for analysis and critique of new media innovations in contemporary academic research. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 270. BodyWorks (Spring 2008): Medicine, Technology, and the Body in Early 21st Century America. CCI, EI, STS. Influence of new medical technologies (organ transplantation, VR surgery, genetic engineering, nano-medicine, medical imaging, DNA computing, neuro-silicon interfaces) on the American imagination from WWII to the current decade. Examines the thesis that these dramatic new ways of configuring bodies have participated in a complete reshaping of the notion of the body in the cultural imaginary and a transformation of our experience of actual human bodies. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 92FCS.01. How They Got Game (Fall 2007) explores the history and cultural impact of interactive simulations and video games. Evolution of computer and video game design from its beginnings to the present: storytelling, strategy, simulation, sports, 3D first-person games. Cultural, business, and technical perspectives. Insights into design, production, marketing, and socio-cultural impacts of interactive entertainment and communication. (Instructors: Lenoir, Herron)

ISIS 250. Critical Studies in New Media (Fall 2007) examines recent new media technologiess—such as videogames, VR, computer graphics animation, and digital art installations—via an engaging, transdisciplinary approach. The Course will build upon existing work in literature, film, and technology studies by McLuhan, Foucault, Peirce, Derrida, Kittler, Deleuze, Bergson, Baudrillard, and others to question what exactly is "new" about new media. (Instructor: Lenoir)